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Saturday, April 5, 2008

the eyes of the rainbow...

encouragement comes to me from a lot of different places. i am appreciative and grateful for my abundant blessings.

many thanks to Ensayn1 @ ensayn reality! i had time just now to follow your suggestion and had to laugh out loud at the timeliness of the message. God is so good to me:-)!

so, i thought i would pay it forward. may Queen's wisdom bless, encourage, and inspire others right now as well...
















i will not hang my head in shame before my ancestors.

i will choose to be human, loving, kind, and respectful of all humanity.

i love black people---men, women and children. i will do my part to bring healing to our family...


SELF LOVE~SELF ACCEPTANCE~SELF RESPECT

20 comments:

Ensayn1 said...

FP, Nuff respect. We are at a time that we can uplift dispite the opposing noise. Never hang our heads, always stand strong!

focusedpurpose said...

Ensayn1-

i am standing in solidarity with fist raised:-) black, powerful, determinedly resistant...

now i feel soft and mushy and am giving you a big hug of gratitude and appreciation.

thank you for your kind words.

blessings,
focusedpurpose

tasha212 said...

I watched this documentary and it was so beautiful. I love Queen Assata. She speaks truth to power and even when under duress, she refuses to bend. I wish that some of these negroes here had that much courage. I was thinking about what you said about the need for us not to conform. Too many black people think that progress is synonymous with becoming a part of this system as it exists and not as striving to change it.

I also thought about your assessment of blogging while brown. I registered for the conerence mainly because I think it will be fun and interesting to meet other bloggers and readers. I think the people who organized the conference were trying to be inclusive of all bloggers of color, not just black people. U know some of us have a problem with making meetings or organizations or conferences exclusively for us. We feel we need to be inclusive of others, even when they don't want to be included with us. Are you planning to go?

Anyway, these are just my thoughts. Anxiously awaiting your response....

focusedpurpose said...

hi Tasha:-)

i spent yesterday licking my wounds and cussing. frowned up, crying, sick with it looking at my husband and son (black men) crossed eyed. LOL!!!

i know i am blessed because they both asked me what i needed from them and gave me so many hugs i lost count. they cooked dinner and told me they loved me. all day:-) we all listened to the podcast as a family affair---so they knew what i was upset about. i think at the end of it they felt more ashamed than angry. they seem more protective as a result.

once they went to sleep i followed Ensayn1's suggestion and had to laugh out loud! God is good. my journey is purposeful and whenever i feel like throwing my hands up i get word that i must be vigilant, focused, and purposeful. this isn't a popularity contest. Queen Assata confirmed this for me in the wee hours of the morning.

black is inclusive of all colors. if one must give a color and are black---calling it what it is should be the only option. black. or do as white folks do, give no color and make it black! how is brown inclusive? it is indicative of the new formula most black folks are unwittingly conforming to which is "the assimilated negro= t.a.n." which is why it is crucial to think. especially when not thinking is to act against the best interest of black---a.k.a. the american way.

that said, i did not register to go. i plan to leave the country. my family and i are in the re-location process right now. we will make one other u.s. stop on the way out.

since i was a little girl, i have decided who was addressing me and who was not. so if a product is plastered with blonde images i have decided it was not for me. i don't turn myself inside out trying to make it for me.

i am blogging while black! more to the point, i am blogging while dominant, dna coiled resilient, electric hair, mother of civilization, self loving& respecting, don't care who doesn't like it, proud to be black! black folks that are the most brain dead see this as hatred. i couldn't care less at this point. we live in a country that was built on white supremacy/racism and refuse to save ourselves.

so, i really did decide that "blogging while brown" was a hispanic convention:-) i am not opposed to people getting with other people that look like them. i think it healthy. unhealthy, enslaved people always want to fight to be included with other people.

how is loving black not inclusive? that is a lie from the pit of hell and i reject it. period. so if it is a black blogger convention why call it "brown"? there is pathology there whether anyone else wants to examine it. i don't want to examine it...i just want no parts of it. i want to be healthy. i will be healthy. i have made up my mind. that said, i am not against anyone else doing what works for them. i can only do what works for me. our strength is in our differences.

blessings sis,
focusedpurpose

tasha212 said...

Focusedpurpose,

I understand how you feel about BWB. I was just trying to explain why the organizers may have named it that (I thought the name was strange too). Anyway, where are you relocating to, if you don't mind me asking?

focusedpurpose said...

hi Tasha:-)

sorry if my last response seemed harsh. i just have no patience for black folks distancing themselves from other black folks. it is very much a part of the problem.

i am officially what is called an agitator:-) with the patriot act and other gov't issues working against american citizens---let me decline to divulge my whereabouts. do i sound paranoid? maybe so:-) i realize this. suffice it to say that i will blend in!

blessings sis,
focusedpurpose

Ana said...

Focusedpurpose: I wish you all the best in your re-location and endeavors.I am a bit surprised also at the "brown" term. I have heard a few blacks here in the United States referring to themselves as "brown". I always believe they assume it sounds chic,posh or I don't know what.

Few latinos refer to themselves as brown. There is a wide variety among the latino population so giving this group a specific color was never considered, especially when a cultural term Latino is more viable.I don't think "blogging while brown" is referred to latinos, but it is mere indicative of blacks who are not comfortable with the term "black".I also don't like the term brown.We are Black people. Period.

I hope we will be able to still keep in touch. I will e-mail you again to give you my e-mail address.All the best, and may God guide you.

Saludos.

Khadija said...

FP:

Best wishes on your relocation & future efforts!I sent you an e-mail with my e-mail address; I hope that you'll be able to keep in touch.

Yes, I was kind of put-off by the "brown" reference. But I'm not surprised. Let's see: The Nation of Islam traditionally refers to Black folks as "the Asiatic Black man" and many Nation members reject the term "African-American."

I pledged a sorority in college that considered itself a Black "Greek" organization, along with the other Black sororities/fraternities.
__________________________________
[*LOL* For my own credibility, I feel the need to explain this bizarre move on my part. It's a funny story, I'll tell the shorter version:

I considered them a joke. I applied as a joke with the intention of quitting after hearing one meeting's worth of insider mumbo-jumbo. I was dismissive & pissed them off during the interview, because they let me onto the pledge line with the intention of beating/kicking my a**. There was an incident during that 1st meeting where they learned that I can have...err...unpredictable reactions. *LOL*

When I left the 1st meeting, one of the "big sisters" asked me, "B****, when are you going to drop off of this pledge line?" I stayed out of spite. They called the national office to complain & try to get me removed from the pledge line. The grown-ups at the national office weren't trying to hear it. I heard later that one official laughed & suggested that the females of that chapter had finally "picked the wrong person." They were stuck with me.]
________________________________
Anyway...There's the NAACP that still retains the "colored" term almost a century after its founding.

There are legions of formerly "Black" folks clamoring to be identified as anything other than Black. They are "biracial," "mixed," "Cablanasian." A coworker recently told me that she knows of some Negro female who calls herself "tri-racial." This person justifies this because one of her two Black parents is half-White.

I've been reading about Negro Muslims who call themselves "just Muslims" and therefore not Black.

The infinite ways that self-hatred can manifest itself is mind-boggling. But not surprising. As you often say, there is nothing new under the sun.

Peace, blessings & best wishes.

aya said...

Peace, blessings and many prayers from me to you in your relocation.

This is something I'm thinking long and hard about too. Truly.

focusedpurpose said...

hi Ana-

thank you for your well wishes:-)

i have heard latina/latinos refer to themselves as brown. true story:

i was the department head of a team of folks in a firm. as i began to build my own team, i very politely and fairly got rid of all the white folks that were my subordinates that seemed in thought and action to believe their white skin nullified my title/position and their responsibility to me.

as a result of surrounding myself with talented people that didn't waste my time with white supremacy, my bosses routinely sat me down to talk about the need to "diversify" my team. so, me being me, i hired white looking hispanics. i cracked up as i hired blonde haired blue eyed spanish speaking hispanics. in addition to hiring obviously brown hispanics that people would readily know where people of color. this "diversified" my black performing team. in doing so, i learned of the color lines that exist in the hispanic community. the caste system if you will. i noticed brown people that had begun to chant black/brown was beautiful while the white looking ones declared themselves a superior "prize".

i then hired a spanish woman, from spain that was adamant about making sure everyone knew she was "european" not to be confused with mexicans/latinos which she said in a way that seemed as if it left a bad taste in her mouth. i watched incredulously as she exploited the hispanics that wanted so desperately to receive her stamp of approval.

incredulously, as it became more and more obvious that she was eurotrash plain and simply. one day she became so beside herself (the spanish woman) as french women questioned her heritage (keep in mind the anti-immigrant swing was in full motion/ immigrant being only mexican) that i felt compelled to hit her with a historical reality check. so as she hatefully and vehemently distanced herself from hispanics, i "comforted" her by saying those moors opened her to all types of prejudice. how dare they make everyone mistake and treat her as a person of color! she seemed genuinely confused. she wasn't sure if she felt thankful or insulted. they are facts so she couldn't argue:-) if nothing else, she made a point of missing me with the white supremacy non sense. most importantly we worked together well, as that was our relationship.

i said all that to say that latinos/latinas understand themselves to be brown when they must assign a color. you are correct to say that typically they come from a cultural place which renders more pride and sense of self.

black folks could have this as well as soon as they embrace mother africa. i think the hiccup lies in waiting for white folks to encourage this course of action.

sis, i have your email address. we will definitely stay in touch!

blessings sis,
focusedpurpose

focusedpurpose said...

Khadija-

all i can say is amen. it is so silly at this point i have to laugh. i got your email. we will definitely stay in touch.

i have been suggesting folks like the ones you described learn the history of argentina. this has all been done before. i can't spend a lot of time worrying about it at this point:-)

Aya- i would urge you to make the necessary provisions to move yourself and those of your loved ones that will go. a great deal of my family does not want to learn another language and move. i have to release them and keep moving forward. as Queen A says, separation is a part of the african experience.

thank you for your kind encouragement!

we will still meet in the blogosphere as long as i am able to show up, speak up, and listen:-)

blessings in abundance,
focusedpurpose

Danielle said...

FP - I want to say thank you for posting these videos. They are the reminder that we all need to never forget who we are and where we come from.

I also wish you all the best w/your relocation.

focusedpurpose said...

hi Danielle-

it is my pleasure and you are very welcome sis. they blessed me so tremendously i see it as my duty to pay it forward and bless/encourage/inform others.

thank you for your well wishes:-)

blessings,
focusedpurpose

sevenofnine said...

My Sister,

After passing them by many times,
I finally stopped to look at the Eyes of the Rainbow videos posted on your home page. I was pleased to learn that "Eyes of the Rainbow" is a beautifully made tribute to ASSATA SHAKUR, who just turned 60 this month! The Director is Gloria Rolando who is best known for an outstanding film about FIDEL CASTRO called 'Fidel.'

I wish you had told your readers, including myself, that "Eyes of the Rainbow" was about Assata, so I could have watched it sooner! Assata is another one of my favorite people, (s)heros!
Assata's name does not appear AT ALL on your home page, and only once in a comments left by Tasha 212. Was that an oversight?

Barry


P.S. I look forward to learning about Argentina

focusedpurpose said...

hi Barry-

welcome back:-)

Assata is/has been on my blog roll. i love her. she motivates me to no end. i celebrated her birthday as well. check out:

happy belated birthday, Queen Assata

i posted her birthday letter and drew such inspiration and encouragement. it is amazing how clearly she can see when most in america can't or like to pretend they can't see what is clear and plain.

i think her name was missing from this thread because we were having a continued conversation.

Ensayn from Ensayn Reality had suggested that i see the documentary after i posted Queen Assata's letter. after the naacp podcast, i was so discouraged that i decided to follow his advice and had to laugh and post it for others; so renewed was my faith:-)

i really don't seek to spoon feed people information. i would rather others go in search of information and share it. this way we all learn. i am glad you took the time to get fed by Queen Assata. she is amazing to say the least.

blessings,
focusedpurpose

sevenofnine said...

Thank you my sister,

I read Assata's 60th Birthday Letter to the People on Black Commentator.com or BlackAgenda.com I don't know how I missed your Happy Belated Birthday post on April 8th. Perhaps you should link only to the first part of Gloria Rolando's five part video on Assata. You Tube itself provides links to the other four parts, and it would free up space.

I encourage everyone to read Assata's well written autobiography named simply "ASSATA":

http://www.amazon.com/Assata-Autobiography-Lawrence-Hill-Co/dp/1556520743/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208528694&sr=8-1

She describes the events that led up to her exile in Cuba for the past 30 years. (I was happy seeing her looking so well in the video!) You will learn about her life, including her near gang rape as a teen here in Brooklyn, her working with the Panthers in their Harlem breakfast program, her being placed on the FBI most wanted list and having to go into hiding for a number of years, her eventual capture and giving birth in prison.

Gloria Rolando's video about Assata which you have posted here is wonderful! I especially liked the Afro-Cuban dance scenes!
For me, Assata's book was even better!


Barry

sevenofnine said...

Thank you my sister,

I read Assata's 60th Birthday Letter to the People on Black Commentator.com or BlackAgenda.com I don't know how I missed your Happy Belated Birthday post on April 8th. Perhaps you should link only to the first part of Gloria Rolando's five part video on Assata. You Tube itself provides links to the other four parts, and it would free up space.

I encourage everyone to read Assata's well written autobiography named simply "ASSATA":

http://www.amazon.com/Assata-Autobiography-Lawrence-Hill-Co/dp/1556520743/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208528694&sr=8-1

She describes the events that led up to her exile in Cuba for the past 30 years. (I was happy seeing her looking so well in the video!) You will learn about her life, including her near gang rape as a teen here in Brooklyn, her working with the Panthers in their Harlem breakfast program, her being placed on the FBI most wanted list and having to go into hiding for a number of years, her eventual capture and giving birth in prison.

Gloria Rolando's video about Assata which you have posted here is wonderful! I especially liked the Afro-Cuban dance scenes!
For me, Assata's book was even better!


Barry

focusedpurpose said...

hi Barry:-)

the book is ALWAYS better:-)

i am not all that technologically savvy. i am simply committed to the message. so i do the best i can. also, with some things---like this, i want to put it all out there.

please know, i am not at all concerned with space. i am more concerned with substance. so please, do not apologize for length in your comments. i welcome it here. i also reserve the right to use all the space it takes to give room to my voice as well:-)

thanks for stopping in!

blessings,
focusedpurpose

Jacuma said...

Uhuru, we give asante sana to you and our Ancestors for allowing us to share Mama Assata be sure to link up http://www.eyesoftherainbow.com view it, download it copy it pass it on...

Eyes of the Rainbow said...

You are upholding Assata Shakur's words thank you!

"Like most poor people in the United States, I have no voice. The Black press and the progressive media, as well as Black civil rights organizations, have historically played an essential role in the struggle for social justice. We should continue and expand that tradition. We should create media outlets that help to educate our people and our children, and not annihilate their minds. I am only one woman. I own no TV stations or radio stations or newspapers. But I believe that people need to be educated as to what is going on and to understand the connection between the news media and the instruments of repression in America. All I have are my voice, my spirit and the will to tell the truth. But I sincerely ask those of you in the Black media, those of you in the progressive media and those of you who believe in truth and freedom to publish my story.' - Assata Shakur

http://www.eyesoftherainbow.com